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Are Japanese Knives Worth It? The Results May Shock You (Especially If You Are a Bargain Ho)

Bargain hunters love seeing “originally $1,970, now only $262″. Except there are numerous Japanese knife producers who have knives that start at less than $100 (yea, those brands might even spark the interest of people with an inner bargain ho).

Pssssss, they could never sell their product at the so-called $1,970 price, so the sale price is the all-day, everyday price which is different than the type scours the bargain bins of the outlet malls for the designer brand clothing.

If you are the type to seek out the “going out of business sale, everything must go” (yet the store has had those signs up for the last several years), you are a bargain ho.

I will just say you are budget-conscious.

These bargain hunters are all about getting something they feel is valued at a higher price, and they just happen to be that lucky or special person snagging it up (ancient Chinese secret, they are not getting a deal).

Photo Description: the caption says "culturally, Japanese compete on a quality strategy over a cost strategy."
This is one reason why you will not see massive sale prices or “low, low, low prices” because the focus is on producing a quality product such as with Sony, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Lexus, Toyota, Honda, Canon, Nikon, and the list goes on.

When You Purchase Any Product That Is “Made in Japan” or by a Japanese company, You Are Buying a Piece of the Culture

You get what you pay for, and the Japanese culture focuses on value, and a lot of us know this from firsthand experience, especially if you are an import car (JDM) owner/enthusiast.

If I mention the Lexus LS400, the Nissan GT-R, to the Acura NSX (the real one, the NA1/NA2, not that fake one in name only), you know those cars were all attainable because they were all substantially priced lower than every car in its category at the time. Yet these cars performed at the same level or exceeded expectations than higher-priced vehicles in their respective class.

The NSX was the world’s first mass-produced car to feature an all-aluminum body, and it sold for $57,993 to $62,341 when it first came out in late 1990. The competing car and target for the NSX was initially the Ferrari 328, and later the 348 priced at $101,050 to $103,400

NSX pricing data by GarageDreams.net.

I only dreamt about an NSX as a kid because it felt attainable, and the reasonable pricing was not a fluke. The way things are is a part of the Japanese culture, which prices products and services so that the average salaryman can afford it one day. So if you are looking for a Nissan GT-R or a kitchen/chef knife, a quality product at a reasonable price is what you will get.

Photo Description: "You get what you pay for" is the text on a patterned background.
Culturally, Japan is not a country where consumers haggle on price, so products are priced appropriately.

So Are Japanese Knives Worth It? I Would Say “You Get What You Pay For,” Which Are Quality Products at Reasonable Prices (aka Value)

I love eating out in Japan, and any picture I post on social media, it looks like I am spending $80 to $200 to most Americans when I spent more like $40. None of which is unusual since Michelin-Starred ramen ranges from $9-14. So when it comes to a Japanese chef knife or buying a Lexus, it is the integrity and trust I have in the producer and the service and care that comes with it. That right there is the tremendous value I come to expect from Japanese brands.

The majority of us will opt for the Japanese knives above with the decades to centuries of tradition. Although, there will always be those types who can not resist the Ninja TM series Leonardo edition knives for $8,567, on sale for only $99 (in their head, they are delusionally thinking that they will pass those knives down, along with their collectible cup collection to their next of kin).

For only $29.95, in 3 easy payments, the master cheddar shredder can be yours too.

The Honda NSX was more comfortable, easier to drive, had a lower cost of maintenance, and more reliable than a Ferrari (all the good qualities found in a Honda Accord, yet it could also outperform a Ferrari). Except, there will always be “that person” seeking a bargain, like a Pontiac Fiero with a Testarossa kit.

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